Nadra Nittle

Nadra Nittle

Nadra Kareem Nittle is a Los Angeles-based journalist. She’s reported on education for the Los Angeles News Group, the Atlantic, EdSource and others. She was raised in Evanston, attended public and private schools in the area, and graduated from Occidental College in Los Angeles with a bachelor's and master's degree in English.

Private school was my escape from racial tracking in my suburban district

School pushout of black students is endemic in public education. In California, where I now live, many of the black students forced out of the classroom in recent years weren’t suspended for fighting or bringing weapons to school, but for the subjective behaviors that fall under the umbrella of “willful defiance.” So many black students were disciplined for behaviors that… Read more →

Sorry, poverty and parenting does not absolve suburban schools from tackling racial bias

Race and class alike factored into how teachers treated me when I attended Evanston schools, and I’m sure they continue to factor into how teachers treat students today. While giving families the support they need to help their children succeed in Evanston schools is commendable, placing the onus mostly on black families to close the achievement gap misses the point.… Read more →

Will black parents shoulder the blame for race bias in my hometown’s schools?

This is the second part of a four-part series on the writer’s experience and research on the achievement gap in her hometown of Evanston, Illinois, a diverse suburb north of Chicago and home to Northwestern University. Read Part 1 here.  Evanston formally and voluntarily desegregated its schools in 1966, but a persistent achievement gap has divided black and white students… Read more →

‘You Can’t Read.’ How I overcame my suburb’s racial achievement gap

This is the first part of a four-part series on the writer’s experience and research on the achievement gap in her hometown of Evanston, Illinois, a diverse suburb north of Chicago and home to Northwestern University. One day when I was in second grade, my mother approached me with an envelope in hand. Wordless, she glared at me, and I… Read more →

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