Monthly Archives: August 2017

Can rural students live the American Dream, too?

I grew up in Joiner, Arkansas—a small farming community located in the heart of the Delta; the population back then was about 800, and now it’s even less than that. My grandfather, who raised me alongside my grandmother, worked as a sharecropper—and my family made sure I got a good education because they knew school was the key to a… Read more →

Let’s start high school later in the morning, says this bird-brained study

When schools start before 9 am, “owls” get lower grades than “larks,” concludes a new paper in Scientific Reports, writes Helge Hasselmann for Research Digests. Researchers, led by Giulia Zerbini at University of Groningen, assessed the sleep habits of students at Dutch secondary schools to determine their “chronotypes.” Those with late chronotypes — owls — earned significantly lower grades in science (except for physics) and… Read more →

Why are parents overconfident about academics and stressed out about kids’ happiness?

We’ve known this for a while, but here’s another survey to add fuel to the fire: Parents tend to inflate their kids’ academic progress and deflate their kids’ emotional resilience. In a nutshell, they don’t worry enough about the fact that schools are increasingly unable to prepare students with the skills they need to succeed in college and the workplace–and… Read more →

DC Schools show the value of staying the course on a controversial teacher evaluation system

Today brought some good news about teacher evaluation, an important education improvement that is largely out of favor with school districts and sidelined by the federal government. A new research report sponsored by Education Next suggests that a once-controversial plan to re-imagine the way teachers are reviewed and compensated in Washington D.C. is accomplishing its ultimate goal: To improve student… Read more →

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